Executor’s Commission: What It Is & How It Works

For many, taking up the role of an executor of state would be something honorable. The position is often assigned to a family member or friend of a deceased person who was close and trustworthy to the deceased person. That being the case, the role used to be entirely voluntary and was not something you got compensated for. After all, it was something you were doing for a loved one who had passed away.

This, however, is no longer the case when dealing with estates. With estates and assets becoming more complex, as well as the laws that affect them, a payment for the executor has been established as a way to pay the person dealing with the process. This payment is referred to as an executor’s commission.

A signed document with a pen

How Much Commission Does an Executor Get?

Executor commissions and payments are usually not a pre-set amount. There are a few factors that come into play when deciding how much compensation an executor will get for their work. These often include whether a fee had been mentioned in the will, what percentage the state law says can be given as commission, and if a court decides to apply reasonable compensation, an hourly rate that seems fair for the work.

If there are more than one executors assigned to handling the estate, then the amount may either be divided amongst them, or both may get full and equal compensation, depending on the size of the estate itself.

Executor Payments in New York

For executors in New York, there’s a percentage calculation that usually ends up deciding how much commission an executor will get. Once the will has been looked over by a probate attorney and the estate and all its assets have been valued, you’ll be able to get a percentage of that amount as your commission.

State laws dictate that an executor will get a minimum of 5% if the estate is worth 100,000 dollars. The percentage then drops with each increase in amount, giving 4% on a total of 300,000 dollars, 3% on 1 million dollars, and then finally 2% on values of over 5 million dollars.

People in suits talk to each other

Executor Payments as a Beneficiary

If you’re the executor of an estate but are also one of the beneficiaries of the will, you must be smart about dividing up the payments. The inheritance you get is tax-free, but the commission you get is taxed.

To make sure you end up with the best possible outcome, you should get the help of legal professionals like Ledwidge and Associates. Along with their executor services, they have probate attorneys and estate law attorney Queens and estate law attorney Brooklyn who can help you speed the entire settlement process.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *